Wednesday, November 2

Opening Plenary Session

1:00-2:30 PM ET 


MOUD in the Criminal Justice System

Medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) is a critical component of the evidence-based standard of care for treating opioid use disorders (OUDs), yet many criminal justice programs do not offer MOUD or have blanket prohibitions against methadone or buprenorphine. As a result, persons with OUDs in the justice system have significantly poorer treatment retention and higher relapse rates, criminal recidivism, and overdose deaths. This is unacceptable and raises serious legal and ethical concerns for criminal justice professionals. 

 

This session will discuss the recent evolution of MOUD treatment, review the neuroscience of substance dependence or addiction, research supporting the effects of MOUD, and legal and ethical practice standards governing its use in the justice system.

 

Through this session, participants will understand the neurobiological basis of addiction, learn about FDA-approved medications for the treatment of opioid and alcohol use disorders; hear about the effectiveness of MOUD for substance use disorders and discuss legal and professional practice standards governing MOUD in the criminal justice system 

Speakers:

  • Welcome from Karhlton Moore, Director, Bureau of Justice Assistance 

  • Douglas B. Marlowe, J.D., Ph.D., Senior Scientific Consultant, National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) 

Moderator:

  • Phil Nunes, Executive Director, Eastern Ohio Correction Center and ICJA President-Elect

Break

2:30-2:45 PM ET

 

The View from the States: The Impact of Rising Violent Crime on Innovation 

2:45-4:00 PM ET

Communities across the country have been examining their justice systems to improve fairness and effectiveness. The COVID-19 pandemic caused a cascade of challenges but also accelerated the adoption of policies and practices that are improving efficiency. The rise in violent crime has changed the conversation, but has it changed what’s happening on the ground? The words used to describe these reforms may have shifted, but have the reforms been slowed or goals been changed? This panel of state and county policymakers will discuss what lies ahead in criminal justice policy and practice.

Speakers:

  • Senator Whitney Westerfield, Kentucky

  • Representative Roger Goodman, Washington 

  • Kate Kelly, Executive Director, Office of Firearm Safety & Violence Prevention, WA Department of Commerce 

First Step Act Implementation: Where We Are and Where Things Are Going

2:45-4:00 PM ET

 

In this session, the National Institute of Justice will present an overview of their annual report of the First Step Act (FSA) highlighting progress made by FSA, recidivism rates among individuals who have been released from federal prisons under FSA, an overview of the effectiveness of the Evidence-Based Recidivism Reduction Programs and Productive Activities operated by FBOP among other FSA areas. Then the contracted Bureau of Prisons research team from Texas Christian University will provide insight into the current evaluation of the FBOPs anger management and substance use programs as part of FSA efforts. 

Speaker:

  • Dr. Marie Garcia, National Institute of Justice

  • Alix McLearen, Acting Assistant Director of the Reentry Services Division, Federal Bureau of Prisons

  • Jennifer Lux, Associate Research Scientist, Texas Christian University, Institute of Behavioral Research 

  • Wayne Lehman, Senior Research Scientist, Texas Christian University, Institute of Behavioral Research 

Break

4:00-4:15 PM ET

 

Current Challenges Facing Law Enforcement and Improving Outcomes for Violent Individuals   

4:15-5:30 PM ET 

 

The challenges facing law enforcement are numerous and scrutiny from the public is intense. Chiefs and sheriffs are struggling to improve low officer morale, build partnerships with community-based social service providers, and respond to rising violent crime while improving efficiency and fairness in their policies and practices. At the same time, probation officers struggle with unrealistic caseloads and the challenges of improving outcomes for individuals with violent convictions. This workshop will offer a survey of the environment today in law enforcement and community corrections as well as a review of the research and successful strategies for working with individuals with violent convictions or at-risk for violent behaviors.  

Speaker:

  • Sheriff Rosie Rivera, Salt Lake County, Utah, CEO, Unified Police Department of Salt Lake 

  • Stephanie Spiegel, Ph.D., Research Associate, University of Cincinnati Corrections Institute

Moderater: 

  • Joe Popcun, Executive Deputy Commissioner, New York Division of Criminal Justice Services

A Look at the Focus Areas for DOJ Research

4:15-5:30 PM ET 

In this session, National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Director Nancy La Vigne and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) Director Alex Piquero will share their research priorities for their respective agencies and for the Department of Justice. 

 

For NIJ those priorities include fostering rigorous and inclusive research that informs efforts to promote safer communities and more equitable justice systems; elevating studies that apply a racial equity lens; infusing technology research with a strong implementation science component by supporting evaluations of technology’s implementation in the field and identify both its impacts and its unintended consequences; encouraging interdisciplinary research that includes both quantitative and qualitative inquiries and examines net costs and benefits; and ensuring that research evidence is translated into actionable information to promote change in the field.

 

At BJS those priorities include modernizing BJS, with respect to data usage, data visualization, and data communication; ensuring that BJS data and research products are the most accurate, relevant, and timely; and ensuring that BJS data and research are not just easily accessible but also especially useful to a broad community of researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and the general public. 

Speakers:

  • Nancy La Vigne, Director, National Institute of Justice

  • Alex Piquero, Director, Bureau of Justice Statistics

Moderator:

  • Chris Asplen, Executive Director, National Criminal Justice Association 

Thursday, November 3

Law Enforcement and Community: Strategies for Addressing Trauma, Cultivating Healing, and Building Relationships 

1:00-2:30 PM ET 

Relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve are critical to ensuring communities feel safe and have the opportunity to thrive. This panel will bring together law enforcement leadership and community to discuss the history of mistrust between police and community and strategies to address the trauma, both past and present, and develop relationships to promote healing and ultimately combat violence and promote safer communities. 

Speakers:

  • Lt. Frederick Shavies II, Lieutenant of Police, Oakland Police Department

  • Chief Guillermo Cespedes, Chief of Violence Prevention, City of Oakland  Department of Violence Prevention

  • Sasha Cotton, Senior Director, National Network for Safe Communities at John Jay College, Former Director of City of Minneapolis, Office of Violence Prevention

Moderator:

  • Gillian Caplan, Program Manager, National Criminal Justice Association 

Break

2:30-2:45 PM ET

 

Evaluating Deflection for Accountability, Impact, and Sustainability

2:45-4:00 PM ET

As the field of deflection has grown, so has an interest in understanding how to effectively evaluate and support deflection initiatives in order for states to correctly scale up their efforts. In this session, a panel of experts will discuss the opportunities and challenges of evaluating deflection initiatives by exploring three key questions: 1) What does the existing deflection research show and tell us? 2) What impact does a successful deflection initiative have from a public policy perspective? 3) How can funders and policy leaders such as SAAs move deflection forward in a way that finds a balance between supporting deflection initiatives and seeking accountability? 4) What are the best ways people doing deflection (SAAs, Policymakers, Practitioners, and Funders) can support the evaluation of deflection initiatives? 

 

Audience members will have the opportunity to participate in the conversation by sharing their own experiences and lessons learned.

 

Speakers:

  • Debra Heath, Senior Evaluator, University of New Mexico Division of Community Behavioral Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

  • Jessica Reichert, Senior Research Scientist and the Manager of the Center for Justice Research and Evaluation at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority

  • Pamela Kelley is the Executive Director of Kelley Research Associates

  • Michelle Lydenberg, Research and Evaluation Officer, Interact for Health

 

Moderator:

  • Kelly Firesheets, PsyD, PTACC (Police Treatment and Community Collaborative) Executive Leadership Committee and Vice President, Cordata Healthcare Innovations

Talent and Engagement Strategy: Changes that Work for Today 

2:45-4:00 PM ET

 

We expect that the modern workplace will constantly evolve, but over the past two years, the pace of change has been at the speed of light and presented overwhelming challenges for even the hardiest and most experienced leaders. The public sector and non-profit service providers are experiencing tectonic staffing shortages while facing significant increases in demand for services. In addition, everything about how we hire and retain employees is changing and buffeted by larger economy-wide issues.  

 

In this workshop, we will discuss modern demographic trends that are redefining our field, industry and workplaces and discuss how to respond to the realities of creating a new future of work, from short term changes including pay, scheduling and contract hiring, to longer term strategies in benefits, workplace culture and workforce development.  We will share what seems to be working, what we are planning next and open up discussion for what collaboration and partnership need to look like in order for us all to move forward into the future.  

Speaker:

  • Maureen Donnellan Habel, Vice President of Talent and Engagement, Talbert House

  • Julia Bauer, Research Specialist, Center for City Solutions, National League of Cities 

  • Jacob Gottlieb, Research Specialist, Center for City Solutions, National League of Cities 

  • Rachael Stephens, Program Director, Workforce Development & Economic Policy, National Governors Association

Moderator:

  • Ro-Ellen Sinkewich, Senior Director, Volunteers of America 

Break

4:00-4:15 PM ET

 

Deflection and 988 and Crisis Response: How This All Fits Together 

4:15-5:30 PM ET 

Communities are now focusing on creating earlier and better front-end responses for people with behavioral health issues, both for non-crisis and crisis encounters. As part of this, states are implementing three elements of these responses - 1) Deflection as the broadest, community-based response framework that focuses on early, upstream interventions at the intersection of police, treatment, and community, 2) 988 as a more focused response to suicide and mental health crisis with a mechanism to dispatch responders including without first responders, and 3) Crisis Response as a general type of response that is used in both Deflection and 988. This session will deconflict these elements, provide a framing of how to "do it all", and allow states to build the strongest and most robust systems of responses for their citizens and communities.

Speaker:

  • Dan Gillison Jr, Chief Executive Officer, National Alliance on Mental Illness

  • Elliot Pinsley, President and CEO, Behavioral Health Foundation, National Leadership Council member of the Police, Treatment, & Community Collaborative (PTACC) 

  • Monika Witt, MSW, Policy Manager, National Council for Mental Wellbeing, PTACC NCL Member

 

Moderator:

  • Jac Charlier, Executive Director Police, Treatment, and Community Collaborative (PTACC) 

Current Issues in Youth Crime Prevention and Juvenile Justice Reform

4:15-5:30 PM ET 

 

This session will take a broad look at best practices in juvenile crime prevention and strategies for improving the juvenile justice system. The speakers will survey the landscape on current issues, successes, and opportunities for change. Attendees will hear about the priorities of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, preview a new report on currently incarcerated individuals in prisons for crimes committed as children, and learn about best practices for training and model state practices for law enforcement engagement with youth.

Speakers:

  • Liz Ryan, Director, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice

  • James Dold, CEO and Founder, Human Rights for Kids

  • Lisa Thurau, Strategies for Youth 

Moderator:

  • Natasha Johnson, Lecturer, Georgia State University 

Friday, November 4

Addressing Privacy and Confidentiality in Deflection While Managing Risk and Legal Liability in Deflection

1:00-2:15 PM ET

Deflection requires sharing sensitive information within and between partners from justice, health, and community service systems. This interactive session will review key federal privacy requirements, apply a framework for analysis, discuss implications, and provide best practices that support compliant and effective deflection programs.

 

This session will also introduce participants to areas of potential risk that are relevant to the growing field of deflection. Participants will learn about key legal issues that impact program implementation, discuss the implications of these issues, explore opportunities for solid ground, and review recommend preventative practices.

Speakers:

  • Michele Worobiec, President, National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws 

  • Jon Woodruff, Senior Legislative Attorney, Legislative Analysis and Public Policy Association (LAPPA), a PTACC National Partner

Moderator:

  • Scott Allen, Chief Operating Officer for Operation 2 Save Lives (O2SL) & QRT National

Funding, Partnerships, and Data: Finding Opportunities to Enhance Data Systems

1:00-2:15 PM ET

 

In this workshop, panelists will discuss transactional data integration projects implemented by a consortium of partners/funding sources whose main mission is to enhance public safety and increase access to data for criminal justice partners and their constituents. NCJA Data Analyst Mike Fargen, former CJIS Project Manager for the State of Nebraska, will lead a discussion about how myriad funding options can be explored between State Administrating Agencies who work together to strengthen partnerships using a centralized information system.   

Speakers:

  • Kellie Rabenhorst, Deputy Director OVC VOCA Center/NCJA 

  • Bill Kovarik, Highway Safety Administrator, NE Department of Transportation 

  • Jeff Avey, Director, Criminal Identification Division, NEState Patrol 

Moderator:

  • Mike Fargen, Data Analyst, OVC VOCA Center 

Break

2:15-2:30 PM ET

 

Promoting Positive Outcomes with Women Under Community Supervision

2:30-3:45 PM ET

 

Community supervision was designed and implemented in the United States as an essential alternative to incarceration. Unfortunately, a significant number of women released from incarceration are rearrested and returned to prison or jail, not for the commission of new crimes but for failure to appear, noncompliance with treatment, sanctions related to substance use, and an inability to secure safe and stable housing. The emerging research suggests that we can reduce recidivism and improve outcomes for women by implementing gender-responsive and trauma-informed policies and practices. Many agencies struggle to determine where to start and how to identify evidence-based practices for women.

 

In this session, participants are introduced to the Gender Responsive Policy and Practices Assessment (GRPPA). The GRPPA was initially developed by the Center for Gender and Justice in collaboration with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to help agencies self-assess the alignment of programs and services with the available literature on incarcerated women. More recently, the Center for Effective Public Policy (CEPP), in conjunction with NIC, developed and piloted a community version of this tool known as the GRPPA- Community Version (GRPPA-CV). This tool was piloted in 2021 and 2022 with agencies across the US that provide community services to women. Sites received virtual training and coaching to guide them in conducting a comprehensive evaluation of policies, programs, and services. At the end of this pilot, sites identified strengths, challenges, and opportunities across six domains: (Leadership and culture, Staffing and training, Assessment and Case Planning, Programs and Services, Supervision strategies, and Quality assurance and evaluation). 

Speaker:

  • Dr. Marilyn Van Dieten, Director of the National Resource Center of Justice-Involved Women, Center for Effective Public Policy

Moderator:

  • Lisa Lopez, Program Administrator, Crosspointe, President, International Community Justice Association 

Context Matters: Organizational Characteristics Are Just as Important as EBP 

2:30-3:45 PM ET

 

Over the past 20 years, community corrections workers have been trained in a growing number of evidence-based practices. From core correctional practices to structured curriculum, the role of the community corrections staff has shifted from one of referee—monitoring the rules and blowing the whistle—to coach—a person invested in the outcome of their players (people on supervision).

 

While we have shifted what we do in community corrections, we haven’t shifted the context in which we work. Often, agencies infrastructure has remained the same for the past 20 years. The approach to our work, the way the physical plant is designed, how we train staff, and even our data systems were designed for a different era—one in which we were not focused on behavioral change but on compliance.

 

Over the past five years, we have begun to bring our purpose, practice and organizational infrastructure in line with a behavioral change model. With this rethinking of corrections, we have challenged some of the core components in which organizations operate. Exploring how data are used, the training and coaching of staff, and even how we support staff through coaching models, agencies are starting to create alignment between what we do and how we do it.

 

This presentation will focus on eight key elements agencies can do to help move their organization forward. Based on the 2018 and 2022 articles written by Dr. Lovins and colleagues, we have been working in cooperation with NIC across three jurisdictions to help shift their agencies from referee to coaching organizations. This work started with the Organizational Coaching Assessment (OCA-EBP). From there, we helped the three sites develop tactical plans and implement four core strategies. We will discuss lessons learned and provide a road map for organizations to follow to help them to maximize their success.

Speaker:

  • Dr. Brian Lovins, Principal, Justice System Partners

Break

3:45-4:00 PM ET

 

Closing Session
4:00-5:00 PM ET 

Speaker:

  • Aswad Thomas, Alliance for Safety and Justice

 

Moderator:

  • Ron LeGrand Policy Director, National Criminal Justice Association